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Factors that can trigger postpartum depression

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Postpartum depression or PPD refers to a mental condition that is commonly observed in women after they deliver a baby. This can start as early as immediately post delivering a baby and can last for over some weeks, months or even years, depending on the stage of postpartum depression. There are several factors that can trigger PPD but first, let’s understand what PPD is and what is feels like!

What is postpartum depression?

Postpartum depression is a feeling on sadness and loneliness that a new mom experiences after delivering the baby. There is a feeling of disconnect with oneself, with the baby, and with the outside world on a whole. When a woman is going through PPD, she starts to disorient herself from the routine life. There is a sort of hatred that she develops towards the things she usually loves, which makes it difficult for her to explain her condition and situation to others. If not treated in time, PPD can last for several years, resulting in damaged husband-wife relationship, mother-baby relationship, and other family ties. In certain cases, PPD may cause a life risk as well. 

Most women in India are unaware about PPD and this is what makes things worse as they are unable to identify the condition and explain the same to their near and dear ones. It is vital for women to read about PPD, it’s signs and symptoms, factors and treatments etc, so that timely help can be availed and the health and life of the new mom and the baby is protected. However, one must note that PPD in women is very common and can be treated with a little help from family, friends, and therapists.

What are the factors that trigger PPD?

The list of factors that can trigger PPD is long and varied. Every woman’s postpartum journey is different and hence there can be several reasons that can trigger PPD. Some of the most commonly known reasons that are observed in new moms are listed below. 

  • The pain and trauma of delivering a baby
  • Post-delivery pain and bleeding
  • Weight gain causing lack of confidence
  • Issues with husband, parents or in-laws
  • Marital or partner dissatisfaction
  • Hair fall, skin discoloration and other changes in physical appearance causing stress
  • Hormonal changes
  • History of depression/mental health problems
  • Lack of social support from friends and family
  • Any stressful events that may have occurred during pregnancy or post delivery
  • Domestic violence including physical or psychological abuse/trauma
  • Having had a stressful or complicated pregnancy
  • Having had a stressful or complicated delivery
  • Other medical conditions associated with delivery

P.S. If you or anyone you know is going through a phase of sadness and loneliness post delivering a baby, know that it most likely could be PPD. Talk about it with friends and family and provide as much support as possible so that the mom and baby are happy and healthy and the new mom is able to enjoy every bit of her motherhood journey.

 

About the author:

          
Mrs.Grover is a branding and communications professional. She has over a decade of experience in writing and is inspired by the power of content every single day. She loves to write on matters related to love, life, health, beauty, business, and (now that she’s expecting her first) motherhood.
 

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